Reference Library: Biological effects of OCA

Chemical and biological impacts of ocean acidification along the west coast of North America

  • Posted on: Fri, 12/16/2016 - 10:17
  • By: jackie

The continental shelf region off the west coast of North America is seasonally exposed to water with a low aragonite saturation state by coastal upwelling of CO2-rich waters. To date, the spatial and temporal distribution of anthropogenic CO2 (Canth) within the CO2-rich waters is largely unknown. Here we adapt the multiple ...

Water quality criteria for an acidifying ocean: Challenges and opportunities for improvement

  • Posted on: Tue, 11/01/2016 - 11:50
  • By: jackie

Acidification has sparked discussion about whether regulatory agencies should place coastal waters on the Clean Water Act 303(d) impaired water bodies list. Here we describe scientific challenges in assessing impairment with existing data, exploring use of both pH and biological criteria. Application of pH criteria is challenging because present coastal ...

Overview of Coastal Acidification in the Northeast Region

  • Posted on: Tue, 10/25/2016 - 14:42
  • By: petert

This four-page brochure provides an introduction to ocean and coastal acidification, its effects on marine life, why the Northeast is especially vulnerable, research priorities for the region, and what people can do to fight coastal acidification. The information in the brochure is adapted from NECAN's 2015 Oceanography article. 

Linking Rising pCO2 and Temperature to the Larval Development and Physiology of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus)

  • Posted on: Fri, 10/07/2016 - 10:16
  • By: jackie

Few studies have evaluated the joint effects of elevated temperature and pCO2 on marine organisms. In this study we investigated the interactive effects of Intergovernmental Panel on Clinate Change predicted temperature and pCO2 for the end of the 21st century on key aspects of larval developm,ent of the American lobster, Homarus americanus, an otherwise well-studied, ...

The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, shows negative correlation to naturally elevated carbon dioxide levels: Implications for near-term ocean acidification effects

  • Posted on: Wed, 06/15/2016 - 21:10
  • By: petert

At an oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast, researchers found that production of oyster larvae and growth of young oysters dropped when the aragonite saturation state decreased in seawater. (Laboratory study)

Effects of ocean acidification, temperature and nutrient regimes on the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica: A mesocosm study

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Appendicularians are free-swimming tunicates that are common in most oceans, coastal waters, and estuaries. They build delicate, gelatinous houses that they use to filter food from the water. This study found that appendicularian abundance increased with ocean acidification, warmer temperatures, and higher nutrient levels. This suggests that appendicularians will play ...

Reviewing the impact of increased atmospheric CO2 on oceanic pH and the marine ecosystem.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

The world’s oceans contain an enormous reservoir of carbon, greater than either the terrestrial or atmospheric systems. The fluxes between these reservoirs are relatively rapid such that the oceans have taken up around 50% of the total carbon dioxide (CO2) released to the atmosphere via fossil fuel emissions and other ...

Maternal effects may act as an adaptation mechanism for copepods facing pH and temperature changes

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Copepods produced more eggs in warmer temperatures, but the increase was smaller when copepods were simultaneously exposed to warmer temperature and ocean acidification conditions (lower pH). When pH changed between egg production and hatching, fewer eggs hatched. Warmer egg production temperature induced a positive maternal effect and increased the egg ...

Biocalcification in the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) in relation to long-term trends in Chesapeake Bay pH

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Estuarine waters are more susceptible to acidification because they are subject to multiple acid sources and are less buffered than marine waters. Consequently, estuarine shell-forming species may experience acidification sooner than marine species although, the tolerance of estuarine calcifiers to pH changes is poorly understood. This study analyzed 23 years ...

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