Extensive dissolution of live pteropods in the Southern Ocean

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When scientists collected pteropods living in the Southern Ocean, where high levels of CO2 caused low availability of calcium carbonate in the water for building shells, they found that the pteropods' shells had severely dissolved. In the laboratory, pteropods incubated under similar CO2 conditions had equivalent levels of dissolution. ...

Larvae of the pteropod Cavolinia inflexa exposed to aragonite undersaturation are viable but shell-less

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When larvae of Mediterranean pteropods were cultured in pH 7.82 water, they had malformations and less shell growth. At pH 7.51, the larvae did not make shells but survived and showed normal development. In a natural setting, the smaller shells or lack of shells would have both ecological and biogeochemical ...

Relative influences of ocean acidification and temperature on intertidal barnacle post-larvae at the northern edge of their geographic distribution

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification (pH 7.7) impaired growth and development of an intertidal barnacle (Semibalanus balanoides), but warmer temperature (+4 °C) did not. The mineral composition of the shells did not change with either ocean acidification or warmer temperature. The combination of reduced growth and maintained mineral content suggests that the barnacles ...

Coastal ocean acidification: The other eutrophication problem

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:56
  • By: petert

Increased nutrient loading into estuaries causes the accumulation of algal biomass, and microbial degradation of this organic matter decreases oxygen levels and contributes towards hypoxia. A second, often overlooked consequence of microbial degradation of organic matter is the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and a lowering of seawater pH. To ...

Saturation-state sensitivity of marine bivalve larvae to ocean acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:50
  • By: petert

Ocean acidification results in co-varying inorganic carbon system variables. Of these, an explicit focus on pH and organismal acid–base regulation has failed to distinguish the mechanism of failure in highly sensitive bivalve larvae. With unique chemical manipulations of seawater we show definitively that larval shell development and growth are dependent ...

Anthropogenic ocean acidification over the twenty-first century and its impact on calcifying organisms

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:33
  • By: petert

Today's surface ocean is saturated with respect to calcium carbonate, but increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are reducing ocean pH and carbonate ion concentrations, and thus the level of calcium carbonate saturation. Experimental evidence suggests that if these trends continue, key marine organisms—such as corals and some plankton—will have difficulty ...

Carbonate Mineral Saturation State as the Recruitment Cue for Settling Bivalves in Marine Muds

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:25
  • By: petert

After a pelagic larval phase, infaunal bivalves undergo metamorphosis and transition to the underlying sediments to begin the benthic stage of their life history, where they explore and then either accept or reject sediments. Although the settlement cues used by juvenile infaunal bivalves are poorly understood, here we provide evidence ...

Influence of sediment acidification and water flow on sediment acceptance and dispersal of juvenile soft-shell clams (Mya arenara L.)

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 14:32
  • By: petert

Although ocean acidification is expected to reduce carbonate saturation and yield negative impacts on open-ocean calcifying organisms in the near future, acidification in coastal ecosystems may already be affecting these organisms. Few studies have addressed the effects of sedimentary saturation state on benthic invertebrates. Here, we investigate whether sedimentary aragonite ...

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