Reference Library: Aquaculture

Lessons from two high CO2 worlds – future oceans and intensive aquaculture

  • Posted on: Fri, 10/28/2016 - 13:40
  • By: jackie

Exponentially rising CO2 (currently ~400 µatm) is driving climate change and causing acidification of both marine and freshwater environments. CO2 directly affects acid–base and ion regulation, respiratory function and aerobic performance in aquatic animals. Elevated CO2 projected for end of this century (e.g. 800–1000 µatm) can also impact physiology, and have substantial ...

The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, shows negative correlation to naturally elevated carbon dioxide levels: Implications for near-term ocean acidification effects

  • Posted on: Wed, 06/15/2016 - 21:10
  • By: petert

At an oyster hatchery on the Oregon coast, researchers found that production of oyster larvae and growth of young oysters dropped when the aragonite saturation state decreased in seawater. (Laboratory study)

Photosynthetic responses to solar UV radiation of Gracilaria lemaneiformis cultured under different temperatures and CO2 concentrations.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

The combined effect of ocean acidification and rising temperature enhanced the sensitivity of a red alga to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This was reflected in an increased damage rate, decreased repair rate, and decreased ratio of repair to damage in thalli. The findings suggest that ocean acidification and warming will reduce ...

Future oceanic warming and acidification alter immune response and disease status in a commercial shellfish species, Mytilus edulis L.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification and/or warmer temperatures may affect immune response, parasite abundance and diversity, and bacterial infection of blue mussels. (Laboratory study)

Ocean warming, more than acidification, reduces shell strength in a commercial shellfish species during food limitation

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

After six months exposure, warmer temperatures, but not ocean acidification, significantly reduced the shell strength of blue mussels, which were fed for a limited period of only 4-6 hours per day. The rising temperatures seemed to affect shell strength indirectly, as the mussels apparently re-allocated energy from shell formation to ...

Effects of seawater temperature and pH on the boring rates of the sponge Cliona celata in scallop shells

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification increased the rate at which sponges bored into scallop shells. At pH 7.8, sponges bored twice the number of papillar holes and removed two times more shell weight than at pH 8.1. Greater erosion caused by the lower pH weakened the scallop shells. A warmer water temperature had ...

Vulnerability and adaptation of US shellfisheries to ocean acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:16
  • By: petert

Ocean acidification is a global, long-term problem whose ultimate solution requires carbon dioxide reduction at a scope and scale that will take decades to accomplish successfully. Until that is achieved, feasible and locally relevant adaptation and mitigation measures are needed. To help to prioritize societal responses to ocean acidification, we ...