Larvae of the pteropod Cavolinia inflexa exposed to aragonite undersaturation are viable but shell-less

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When larvae of Mediterranean pteropods were cultured in pH 7.82 water, they had malformations and less shell growth. At pH 7.51, the larvae did not make shells but survived and showed normal development. In a natural setting, the smaller shells or lack of shells would have both ecological and biogeochemical ...

Reduced pH sea water disrupts chemo-responsive behaviour in an intertidal crustacean

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification conditions interfered with the chemoreception, or "smelling", that hermit crabs use to find shells and prey. The hermit crabs moved less, had lower flicking rates of their antennae (a ‘sniffing’ behavior in decapods), and were less successful in locating the odor source. (Laboratory study)

Reduced sea water pH disrupts resource assessment and decision making in the hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Hermit crabs living in highly acidified seawater (pH 6.8) were less likely to leave a suboptimal shell in favor of an optimal shell. Those that did change shells took longer to do so. Crabs in acidified water also moved less and had lower flicking rates of their antennae (a ‘sniffing’ ...

Vulnerability of early life stage Northwest Atlantic forage fish to ocean acidification and low oxygen

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

For three ecologically important estuarine fish species—inland silverside, Atlantic silverside, and sheepshead minnow—the early life stages were more sensitive to low oxygen than they were to low pH. The combination of low oxygen and low pH had the biggest effect. The results suggest that ocean acidification and hypoxia may reduce ...

Environmental salinity modulates the effects of elevated CO2 levels on juvenile hardshell clams, Mercenaria mercenaria

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

For juvenile hard-shell clams, ocean acidification alone or in combination with low salinity reduced the hardness and fracture toughness of their shells. This may reduce protection against predators. Salinity should be taken into account when predicting the effects of ocean acidification on estuarine bivalves. (Laboratory study)

The growing human footprint on coastal and open-ocean biogeochemistry

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Climate change, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide, excess nutrient inputs, and pollution in its many forms are fundamentally altering the chemistry of the ocean, often on a global scale and, in some cases, at rates greatly exceeding those in the historical and recent geological record. Major observed trends include a shift ...

Effects of seawater temperature and pH on the boring rates of the sponge Cliona celata in scallop shells

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification increased the rate at which sponges bored into scallop shells. At pH 7.8, sponges bored twice the number of papillar holes and removed two times more shell weight than at pH 8.1. Greater erosion caused by the lower pH weakened the scallop shells. A warmer water temperature had ...

Near future ocean acidification increases growth rate of the lecithotrophic larvae and juveniles of the sea star Crossaster papposus

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Common sunstar larvae and juveniles in ocean acidification conditions grew faster without apparent effects on survival or body structure. Unlike the larvae of some other sea star species that feed on plankton, larval common sunstars rely on nutrition provided in their egg. This difference in life history may enable some ...

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