Reduced calcification of marine plankton in response to increased atmospheric CO2

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Two dominant marine calcifying phytoplankton species, the coccolithophorids Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, produced less calcite under ocean acidification conditions. They also had more deformities and higher rates of incomplete development. The findings suggest that ocean acidification could slow down the production of calcium carbonate in the ocean. (Laboratory study) ...

Skeletal mineralogy in a high-CO2 world

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

This study investigated changes in mineralization in 18 species of marine calcifiers, which were reared for 60 days in different levels of ocean acidification conditions. The results suggest that shell/skeletal mineralogy within some—but not all—marine calcifiers will change as carbon dioxide levels continue rising as a result of fossil fuel ...

The growing human footprint on coastal and open-ocean biogeochemistry

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Climate change, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide, excess nutrient inputs, and pollution in its many forms are fundamentally altering the chemistry of the ocean, often on a global scale and, in some cases, at rates greatly exceeding those in the historical and recent geological record. Major observed trends include a shift ...

History of Seawater Carbonate Chemistry, Atmospheric CO2, and Ocean Acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 16:00
  • By: petert

Humans are continuing to add vast amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere through fossil fuel burning and other activities. A large fraction of the CO2 is taken up by the oceans in a process that lowers ocean pH and carbonate mineral saturation state. This effect has potentially serious consequences ...

Ocean Acidification in the Coastal Zone from and Organism's Perspective: Multipe System Parameters, Frequency Domains, and Habitats

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:53
  • By: petert

Multiple natural and anthropogenic processes alter the carbonate chemistry of the coastal zone in ways that either exacerbate or mitigate ocean acidification effects. Freshwater inputs and multiple acid-base reactions change carbonate chemistry conditions, sometimes synergistically. The shallow nature of these systems results in strong benthic-pelagic coupling, and marine invertebrates at ...

Saturation-state sensitivity of marine bivalve larvae to ocean acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:50
  • By: petert

Ocean acidification results in co-varying inorganic carbon system variables. Of these, an explicit focus on pH and organismal acid–base regulation has failed to distinguish the mechanism of failure in highly sensitive bivalve larvae. With unique chemical manipulations of seawater we show definitively that larval shell development and growth are dependent ...

Anthropogenic ocean acidification over the twenty-first century and its impact on calcifying organisms

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:33
  • By: petert

Today's surface ocean is saturated with respect to calcium carbonate, but increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are reducing ocean pH and carbonate ion concentrations, and thus the level of calcium carbonate saturation. Experimental evidence suggests that if these trends continue, key marine organisms—such as corals and some plankton—will have difficulty ...

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