Reference Library: Crustaceans

Assessing the effects of ocean acidification in the Northeast US using an end-to-end marine ecosystem model

  • Posted on: Wed, 02/01/2017 - 15:03
  • By: jackie

The effects of ocean acidification on living marine resources present serious challenges for managers of these resources. An understanding of the ecosystem consequences of ocean acidification is required to assess tradeoffs among ecosystem components (e.g. fishery yield, protected species conservation, sensitive habitat) and adaptations to this perturbation. We used a ...

Overview of Coastal Acidification in the Northeast Region

  • Posted on: Tue, 10/25/2016 - 14:42
  • By: petert

This four-page brochure provides an introduction to ocean and coastal acidification, its effects on marine life, why the Northeast is especially vulnerable, research priorities for the region, and what people can do to fight coastal acidification. The information in the brochure is adapted from NECAN's 2015 Oceanography article. 

Linking Rising pCO2 and Temperature to the Larval Development and Physiology of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus)

  • Posted on: Fri, 10/07/2016 - 10:16
  • By: jackie

Few studies have evaluated the joint effects of elevated temperature and pCO2 on marine organisms. In this study we investigated the interactive effects of Intergovernmental Panel on Clinate Change predicted temperature and pCO2 for the end of the 21st century on key aspects of larval developm,ent of the American lobster, Homarus americanus, an otherwise well-studied, ...

Impact of anthropogenic ocean acidification on thermal tolerance of the spider crab Hyas araneus

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Thermal sensitivity of spider crabs, as indicated by heart rate, rose under increasing levels of ocean acidification conditions. The results suggest a narrowing of the spider crab's thermal window under moderate increases in ocean acidification. (Laboratory study)

Effects of ocean acidification and warming on the larval development of the spider crab Hyas araneus from different latitudes (54° vs. 79° N)

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Spider crab larvae developed more slowly, grew less, and lower physiological fitness under increasing levels of ocean acidification conditions. (Laboratory study)

Some like it hot: Temperature and pH modulate larval development and settlement of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Sea urchin larvae from the Mediterranean Sea survived at higher rates under ocean acidification conditions, but they grew smaller. Warmer temperatures increased survival and growth rates of the larvae. The results suggest that ocean acidification and warming could boost populations of the sea urchin, increasing its impact on shallow Mediterranean ...

Effects of low pH and raised temperature on egg production, hatching and metabolic rates of a Mediterranean copepod species (Acartia clausi) under oligotrophic conditions.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

The egg production rate, hatching success, and respiration of a Mediterranean copepod were not affected by ocean acidification conditions. Warming and food availability did have some effects. (Laboratory study)

The synergistic effects of increasing temperature and CO2 levels on activity capacity and acid–base balance in the spider crab, Hyas araneus

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Spider crabs were not able to fully buffer their internal pH when exposed to ocean acidification conditions for 12 days. Behavior of the crabs was not impaired by ocean acidification conditions or acute heat stress when they happened separately, but it was when both occurred at the same time. (Laboratory ...

Marine calcifiers exhibit mixed responses to CO2-induced ocean acidification

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Eighteen marine species exposed to ocean acidification conditions for 60 days exhibited a wide range of responses. Ten of the 18 species were affected negatively with lower rates of net calcification and, in some cases, net loss of shell. Those species included temperate corals, pencil urchins, hard clams, conchs, serpulid ...

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