Reference Library: Northeast U.S.

Interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming on subtidal mussels and sea stars from Atlantic Canada

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Sea stars collected in Nova Scotia, Canada, grew more slowly under ocean acidification conditions, and their growth rate decreased further with a warmer temperature. In contrast, blue mussel grew more quickly with no response to temperature within the tested range. Predation of sea stars on mussels, measured as per-capita consumption ...

Reduced early life growth and survival in a fish in direct response to increase carbon dioxide

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When embryos of a common estuarine fish—the inland silverside—were exposed to high CO2 levels until one week after hatching, survival dropped by 74 percent and length by 18 percent. The eggs were more vulnerable to mortality than the post-hatch larvae. The CO2 conditions that were simulated in the study are ...

Effects of ocean acidification on early life stages of shrimp (Pandalus borealis) and mussel (Mytilus edulis)

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When larvae of blue mussels were kept in ocean acidification conditions predicted for 2100 (pH 7.6) there was no marked effect on fertilization, development, abnormalities, or feeding. However, although the mussel larvae were able to form shells, after two months of exposure they were 28 percent smaller than larvae raised ...

Vulnerability of early life stage Northwest Atlantic forage fish to ocean acidification and low oxygen

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

For three ecologically important estuarine fish species—inland silverside, Atlantic silverside, and sheepshead minnow—the early life stages were more sensitive to low oxygen than they were to low pH. The combination of low oxygen and low pH had the biggest effect. The results suggest that ocean acidification and hypoxia may reduce ...

Environmental salinity modulates the effects of elevated CO2 levels on juvenile hardshell clams, Mercenaria mercenaria

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

For juvenile hard-shell clams, ocean acidification alone or in combination with low salinity reduced the hardness and fracture toughness of their shells. This may reduce protection against predators. Salinity should be taken into account when predicting the effects of ocean acidification on estuarine bivalves. (Laboratory study)

Effects of seawater temperature and pH on the boring rates of the sponge Cliona celata in scallop shells

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification increased the rate at which sponges bored into scallop shells. At pH 7.8, sponges bored twice the number of papillar holes and removed two times more shell weight than at pH 8.1. Greater erosion caused by the lower pH weakened the scallop shells. A warmer water temperature had ...

Near future ocean acidification increases growth rate of the lecithotrophic larvae and juveniles of the sea star Crossaster papposus

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Common sunstar larvae and juveniles in ocean acidification conditions grew faster without apparent effects on survival or body structure. Unlike the larvae of some other sea star species that feed on plankton, larval common sunstars rely on nutrition provided in their egg. This difference in life history may enable some ...

Relationship between CO2-driven changes in extracellular acid-base balance and cellular immune response in two polar echinoderm species

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Green sea urchins were able to adjust their internal pH level within 5 days after being placed in ocean acidification conditions, but sea stars (Leptasterias polaris) were not. Internal pH did not appear to be related to immune response. (Laboratory study)

Coastal ocean acidification: The other eutrophication problem

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:56
  • By: petert

Increased nutrient loading into estuaries causes the accumulation of algal biomass, and microbial degradation of this organic matter decreases oxygen levels and contributes towards hypoxia. A second, often overlooked consequence of microbial degradation of organic matter is the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and a lowering of seawater pH. To ...

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