Reference Library: Mollusks

Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 levels on metabolism and oxidative stress in two common marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria)

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Hard shell clams and eastern oysters exposed to moderate warming and ocean acidification conditions showed no sign of persistent oxidative stress. This indicates that long-term exposure to moderately elevated CO2 and temperature minimally affects the cellular redox status in these bivalve species and that the earlier observed negative physiological effects ...

Effects of ocean acidification and elevated temperature on shell plasticity and its energetic basis in an intertidal gastropod.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Common periwinkles had lower shell growth rates and less increase in shell thickness when grown in ocean acidification conditions, warmer temperatures, or both. Shells were also less pointed and more rounded. Those changes in shell growth appeared to result from disruption of the periwinkle's metabolism. (Laboratory studied)

Food supply and seawater pCO2 impact calcification and internal shell dissolution in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Blue mussels from the Baltic Sea grew less when raised for seven weeks under ocean acidification conditions and with limited food algae. Corrosion of the internal shell surface occurred at a range of ocean acidification levels when food supply was low. When food supply was high, corrosion occurred only in ...

Does encapsulation protect embryos from the effects of ocean acidification? The example of Crepidula fornicata.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Unlike most marine invertebrates, the common slipper shell broods its embryos in capsules. This study found that the capsules do not protect the embryos from ocean acidification. When brooded under ocean acidification conditions, larvae had shells that were 6 percent shorter, and the percentage of larvae with abnormalities was 1.5- ...

Ocean acidification and rising temperatures may increase biofilm primary productivity but decrease grazer consumption.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Common periwinkles consumed less food when living under ocean acidification conditions for five weeks, after having been exposed to those conditions for two weeks prior to the experiment. Their food—a biofilm of diatoms, cyanobacteria, and various microbes—increased during that period. However, another group of periwinkles consumed more food than the ...

Impact of ocean acidification on escape performance of the king scallop, Pectan maximus from Norway

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

King scallops in Norway clapped their shells (an escape response) with less force after being exposed to ocean acidification conditions for at least 30 days. The number of claps was unchanged, however. Ocean acidification also narrows the thermal tolerance range of scallops, resulting in elevated vulnerability to temperature extremes. These ...

Energetic plasticity underlies a variable response to ocean acidification in the pteropod, Limacina helicina antarctica

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification conditions suppressed the metabolism of an Antarctic pteropod by approximately 20 percent in some instances. However, the effect on metabolism depended on abundance of phytoplankton in the region and the pteropods' baseline level of metabolism. Pteropod populations may be compromised by climate change, both directly by acidification-related suppression ...

Altered kelp (Laminariales) phlorotannins and growth under elevated carbon dioxide and ultraviolet-B treatments can influence associated intertidal food webs

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Two species of brown kelp responded differently to being grown for 55 days under ocean acidification conditions. One grew more, and the other grew less. There were negative indirect effects on black turban snails that fed on the kelp. (Laboratory study)

Effects of elevated temperature and carbon dioxide on the growth and survival of larvae and juveniles of three species of northwest Atlantic bivalves

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification conditions and warmer temperatures reduced the survival, development, growth, and lipid synthesis of hard clam and bay scallop larvae. During the juvenile life stages, ocean acidification negatively affected juvenile eastern oysters and bay scallops, but not hard clams. Larvae were substantially more vulnerable to ocean acidication than juveniles ...

Pages