Reference Library: Mollusks

Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 levels on energy metabolism and biomineralization of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When quahogs and eastern oysters were exposed to a combination of warmer temperatures and ocean acidification for 15 weeks, shell hardness decreased in both species. By itself, ocean acidification had a small effect on the physiology and metabolism of both species, but it improved survival in oysters. (Laboratory study)

Short-term acute hypercapnia affects cellular responses to trace metals in the hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Experiments with quahogs exposed to trace metal pollutants under ocean acidification conditions revealed complex interactions and indicated that variations in environmental CO2 may modulate the biological effects of trace metals. (Laboratory study)

Interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming on subtidal mussels and sea stars from Atlantic Canada

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Sea stars collected in Nova Scotia, Canada, grew more slowly under ocean acidification conditions, and their growth rate decreased further with a warmer temperature. In contrast, blue mussel grew more quickly with no response to temperature within the tested range. Predation of sea stars on mussels, measured as per-capita consumption ...

Acidification and warming affect both a calcifying predator and prey, but not their interaction

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Muscle length and claw strength of green crabs decreased after the crabs had been in ocean acidification conditions (pH 7.7) for 5 months. Periwinkles tended to have weaker shells in response to acidification. Predation by green crabs on periwinkles did not appear to change under ocean acidification conditions. (Laboratory study) ...

Impact of ocean acidification and elevated temperatures on early juveniles of the polar shelled pteropod Limacina helicina: Mortality, shell degradation, and shell growth.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When pre-winter juvenile pteropods were cultured at a range of warmer temperatures and ocean acidification levels for 29 days, temperature was the overriding cause of increased mortality. However, ocean acidification was the main factor in reducing shell diameter by 10-12 percent and increasing shell degradation by 41 percent. This study ...

The metabolic response of pteropods to acidification reflects natural CO2-exposure in oxygen minimum zones.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Four species of pteropods from the tropical Pacific Ocean that naturally migrate into low-oxygen waters were not adversely affected when grown under ocean acidification conditions. However, another pteropod species, which does not migrate, responded to ocean acidification conditions with reduced oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion. This indicates that the natural ...

Effects of ocean acidification on early life stages of shrimp (Pandalus borealis) and mussel (Mytilus edulis)

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When larvae of blue mussels were kept in ocean acidification conditions predicted for 2100 (pH 7.6) there was no marked effect on fertilization, development, abnormalities, or feeding. However, although the mussel larvae were able to form shells, after two months of exposure they were 28 percent smaller than larvae raised ...

Extensive dissolution of live pteropods in the Southern Ocean

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

When scientists collected pteropods living in the Southern Ocean, where high levels of CO2 caused low availability of calcium carbonate in the water for building shells, they found that the pteropods' shells had severely dissolved. In the laboratory, pteropods incubated under similar CO2 conditions had equivalent levels of dissolution. ...

Effects of CO2- induced seawater acidification on the health of Mytilus edulis.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Blue mussels exposed to highly acidified seawater for sixty days were able to protect their body tissues involved in reproduction, digestion, and respiration. However, the physiological defenses take energy away from other life processes, meaning that long-term exposure to ocean acidification may result in reduced growth and health of blue ...

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