The swimming kinematics of larval Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., are resilient to elevated seawater pCO2

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Video analysis of Atlantic cod larvae (12 and 27 days post-hatch) showed no significant differences in most aspects of their swimming kinematics when they had been cultured under ocean acidification conditions. (Laboratory study)

Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 levels on metabolism and oxidative stress in two common marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria)

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Hard shell clams and eastern oysters exposed to moderate warming and ocean acidification conditions showed no sign of persistent oxidative stress. This indicates that long-term exposure to moderately elevated CO2 and temperature minimally affects the cellular redox status in these bivalve species and that the earlier observed negative physiological effects ...

Effects of ocean acidification and elevated temperature on shell plasticity and its energetic basis in an intertidal gastropod.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Common periwinkles had lower shell growth rates and less increase in shell thickness when grown in ocean acidification conditions, warmer temperatures, or both. Shells were also less pointed and more rounded. Those changes in shell growth appeared to result from disruption of the periwinkle's metabolism. (Laboratory studied)

Food supply and seawater pCO2 impact calcification and internal shell dissolution in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Blue mussels from the Baltic Sea grew less when raised for seven weeks under ocean acidification conditions and with limited food algae. Corrosion of the internal shell surface occurred at a range of ocean acidification levels when food supply was low. When food supply was high, corrosion occurred only in ...

Swimming performance in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) following long-term (4–12 months) acclimation to elevated seawater pCO2

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Swimming performance of Atlantic cod was not impaired after they had lived under ocean acidification conditions for 4 or 12 months. They did not have different metabolic rates, critical swimming speeds, or aerobic scope compared to those that lived in non-acidified seawater. (Laboratory study)

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