Effects of ocean acidification and elevated temperature on shell plasticity and its energetic basis in an intertidal gastropod.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Common periwinkles had lower shell growth rates and less increase in shell thickness when grown in ocean acidification conditions, warmer temperatures, or both. Shells were also less pointed and more rounded. Those changes in shell growth appeared to result from disruption of the periwinkle's metabolism. (Laboratory studied)

Food supply and seawater pCO2 impact calcification and internal shell dissolution in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Blue mussels from the Baltic Sea grew less when raised for seven weeks under ocean acidification conditions and with limited food algae. Corrosion of the internal shell surface occurred at a range of ocean acidification levels when food supply was low. When food supply was high, corrosion occurred only in ...

Swimming performance in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) following long-term (4–12 months) acclimation to elevated seawater pCO2

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Swimming performance of Atlantic cod was not impaired after they had lived under ocean acidification conditions for 4 or 12 months. They did not have different metabolic rates, critical swimming speeds, or aerobic scope compared to those that lived in non-acidified seawater. (Laboratory study)

The effect of carbon dioxide on growth of juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Juvenile Atlantic cod exposed to ocean acidification conditions for 55 days had reduced weight gain, growth rate, and condition. Growth trajectories of those living in medium and high acidification levels were 2.5 and 7.5 times lower than that of those in the low acidification level. The findings suggest that Atlantic ...

Proteomic response of marine invertebrate larvae to ocean acidification and hypoxia during metamorphosis and calcification

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

This study investigated the response of metamorphosing larvae of a tubeworm species (Hydroides elegans) to two climate change stressors—ocean acidification (pH 7.6) and low oxygen (hypoxia)—and to both combined. (Laboratory study)

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